The Center for Inclusive Childcare logo
www.inclusivechildcare.org || Concordia University, College of Education
Cindy Croft, Director || croft@csp.edu || 651.603.6265

  Center For Inclusive Child Care E-News

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CICC E-News, Issue #2. September 2007


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Website Accessibility

By John Simmer, Center For Inclusive Child Care Web Developer and Technology Specialist

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Is your website accessible? Is it Section 508 compliant? If it is not and you receive federal funds you are in violation of the law.

The Center for Inclusive Child Care (CICC) is in the midst of a complete website overhaul and one of our top priorities is 508 compliance, web accessibility for those who require assistive technology like screen readers and variable font size, as well as readability across platforms and device types.

Accessibility goes beyond viewing with a traditional computer. The vast majority of new web browsers sold worldwide are not on personal computers but on portable devices including cell phones. Most websites are essentially inaccessible on a small screen format. And what about those who need to view a printed page due to vision issues or inaccessibility to a computer? Many sites print with missing columns, menus and other items that aren't relevant to the material at hand.

Section 508 of the Rehabilitation act - amended in 1998 - requires that websites of federal agencies and those organizations receiving federal funds are compliant with basic accessibility standards. These standards are detailed at http://www.section508.gov . Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) take Section 508 a step further to insure accessibility for everyone.

Would you like to check and see if your website is “accessible” or “Section 508 compliant?” It's easy using these four simple check points.

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The Center for Inclusive Childcare logo
www.inclusivechildcare.org || Concordia University, College of Education
Cindy Croft, Director || croft@csp.edu || 651.603.6265

Online Training of Trainer Courses

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The Six Keys: Strategies for Promoting Children’s Mental Health in Early Childhood Programs

The Center for Inclusive Child Care, Concordia University, St. Paul, MN, is excited to offer the online Training of Trainer Course on The Six Keys: Strategies for Promoting Children’s Mental Health in Early Childhood Programs. This Training of Trainer Course will begin November 14 and run until December 11. Mandatory chats will be Tuesday nights from 7 PM CST to 8 PM on 11/20, 11/27, 12/4 and 12/11. Participants will receive training materials in a two volume set including text and the training activities curriculum.

This Training of Trainer Course, The Six Keys: Strategies for Promoting Children’s Mental Health in Early Childhood Programs uses evidence-based practice to demonstrate key components necessary for promoting emotional well-being of children in early childhood programs using a training manual with corresponding training activities designed for each workshop (two volume set).

There are a total of seven narrative chapters with 4-8 training activities each that can be developed into a series of seven 2-4 hour workshops or into credit coursework. Materials include theories of emotional development, resilience, self-regulation, temperament, and many useful strategies for the early childhood setting. Training is appropriate for child care, Head Start, special education, Learning Readiness, and early childhood providers and educators.

The Six Keys can be used in many professional development venues including single workshops, credit courses, and ongoing sequential trainings. Enrollment will be limited to 15 participants on a first-come, first-served basis. A certificate of completion for 32 inservice hours will follow completion of the course. The course cost, including text and training curriculum, is $250.00. CEUs are available. For more information on this Training of Trainer professional development opportunity, contact Cindy Croft.

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The Center for Inclusive Childcare logo
www.inclusivechildcare.org || Concordia University, College of Education
Cindy Croft, Director || croft@csp.edu || 651.603.6265

For a complete list of all the Training of Trainer opportunities available through the Center for Inclusive Child Care, visit the CICC TOT Training Center newly scheduled courses are also posted on the CICC Homepage.

Five Training of Trainer Courses Offered Year Round

Five Training of Trainer Courses will be offered online, year round from the Center for Inclusive Child Care’s (CICC) TOT Learning Center which can also be accessed from the CICC’s website. If you are a trainer who wants to take one of these courses to become certified in the content by the CICC, dates of upcoming courses will be posted on the homepage of our website. If you are a Professional Development Coordinator and wish to have trainers in your area gain a new knowledge or skill set, please pass this information on to them.

The Training of Trainer Courses are high quality professional development opportunities and offer the trainer inservice hours with an option for CEUs as well. A flyer detailing the five courses available in pdf format.

Book on "Six Keys..." and Companion Training Curriculum Available

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The Six Keys: Strategies for Promoting Children’s Mental Health in Early Childhood Programs, by Cindy Croft.

This book presents six key elements that are important for all children, to support their positive mental health as they grow. Here is a quote from the author: “I believe passionately that emotional development impacts all other development including how children will learn and how they will make friends, and ultimately, learn to react to the world around them. I think that in our world today, our children are missing some important supports from the adults in their lives, especially when it comes to emotional milestones like self-regulation. We might assume emotional development in children is intuitive but in reality, children need our intentional and responsive caregiving in order to learn to learn express their feelings well, to navigate their social world, and to build positive mental health.”

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The Center for Inclusive Childcare logo
www.inclusivechildcare.org || Concordia University, College of Education
Cindy Croft, Director || croft@csp.edu || 651.603.6265

The Six Keys: Strategies for Promoting Children’s Mental Health in Early Childhood Programs is now available for sale at Amazon.com and also from the publisher at Sparrowmediagroup.com. If you are interested in buying the book, you can go to either website, it sells for $18.00. There is a companion training curriculum that is only available from SparrowMedia. This training curriculum is for people who want to use the book formatted into training workshops or conference workshops for their own trainings.

Publication and Book Information

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New Publication: Successfully Supporting All Children in Early Childhood Education Programs

The New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (NYS DDPC) is pleased to announce the availability of a new publication.

In 2006, NYS DDPC sought articles from early care and education programs from across the State to document successful experiences related to:

This publication details promising strategies and approaches used by child care providers to include children with disabilities in early care and education programs.

Electronic copies of the publication can be obtained or hard copies can be requested by contacting Kerry Wiley, at DDPC, at 1-800-395-3372 or via email at kwiley@ddpc.state.ny.us.

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The Center for Inclusive Childcare logo
www.inclusivechildcare.org || Concordia University, College of Education
Cindy Croft, Director || croft@csp.edu || 651.603.6265

New book highlights siblings of children with disabilities

Allana Hayes, 20, is majoring in special education because she dreams of an ordinary life for her brother Brett, 16, who was born with a rare developmental disability. Her story is one of dozens in a new book "Who Asked Me: A Journal of Discovery and Sharing By and For Siblings of People with Developmental Disabilities," edited by Adele Bergstrom. Ms Bergstrom launched the project after reading an essay her daughter had written about her brother with Down syndrome. For more information or to order the book, visit Fraser’s website.

Working with Families: Rethinking Denial

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Working with Families: Rethinking Denial is a very thoughtful article that deals with what families go through in processing their understanding what life may be like for their child with a disability.

What professionals have long thought of as the grief process, including the step of denial, may not be useful when working with families. As the authors assert, “Even today, with research supporting well-planned and effective interventions, no one can accurately know or precisely predict what children with disabilities will accomplish and become in their future. Still, some professionals characterize parents as “in denial” when they think the parents do not accept their child’s disabilities and limitations.

It is important to explore the implications of the well-worn phrase “in denial,” and to begin a discussion on reframing the concept of denial.” The authors go on to offer five important strategies for supporting families as they go through the early intervention process, including:

Helen Keller’s mother refused to put her daughter in an asylum; she believed someone could help her. Some people probably said she was in ‘denial,’ but Katie Keller continued to hope for the best outcomes for her child. We may need to rethink denial in the context of hope.
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The Center for Inclusive Childcare logo
www.inclusivechildcare.org || Concordia University, College of Education
Cindy Croft, Director || croft@csp.edu || 651.603.6265

Challenging Behaviors in Child Care

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When challenging behaviors happen in child care, facilitating the responses of the children, parents, and staff in a program can also be challenging, but is a responsibility of a leader or primary caregiver that cannot be ignored or put on a back burner. Some of these behaviors can include a child biting another child, hitting or scratching or using other forms of aggression. If a child’s behaviors are not addressed respectfully and immediately, they will escalate. You also need to assure that all staff communicating to a family are on the same page, consistent in philosophy and recommendations…

View the article written by Chris Bentley

The Center for Inclusive Child Care’s Somali Project

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The Center for Inclusive Child Care (CICC) has been working with the Somali community in Minnesota for the past three years and during that time has trained ten Somali native speakers using the Project EXCEPTIONAL (PE) Curriculum. The CICC has a Somali training coordinator, Huda Farah, who works with these trainers and provides technical assistance. These trainers have been consistently delivering the PE training to the Somali community over the past three years. For the past two years the CICC has provided a Somali track in its annual “Together We Can” Inclusion Institute conference.

The newest development coming from the CICC’s Somali Project is a new video produced for the Somali community. This video is titled: A Guide to Developmental Milestones, Red Flags, Early Intervention and Inclusion of Children With Special Needs.

Huda Farah, the CICC Somali Training Coordinator has written a comprehensive introduction to this video. This article contains detailed information regarding the cultural barriers and challenges facing Somali families of children who have special needs and highlight the role of the new CICC video. Read the article by Huda Farah . If you would like ordering information for the video, A Guide to Developmental Milestones, Red Flags, Early Intervention and Inclusion of Children With Special Needs contact Cindy Croft at the Center for Inclusive Child Care via email or phone: (651)603-6265.